Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Blog Tour Free Giveaway for "The War Between Us" by Sarah Creviston Lee


The War Between Us by Sarah Creviston Lee

Publication Date: December 14, 2015
Paperback & eBook; 330 Pages

Genre: Historical Fiction


Editor's Choice Award from the Historical Novel Society.

Alex Moon is not the enemy.

Six months after Pearl Harbor's tragedy, Korean American Alex Moon is sent away from his home in California for refusing his father's request to join the fight against the Japanese. On his journey, Alex is attacked and stranded in the small town of River Bluff, Indiana just for looking like America's most hated enemy.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

The Rise and Fall of Ragtime

Book Review of Temptation Rag: A Novel by Elizabeth Hutchison Bernard.


Back in the late 19th century in America, the latest rage was ragtime music. While the first name that might come to mind for us today is Scott Joplin, the origins of this musical genre predated him by quite a bit. In the beginning this was considered an original genre started by African Americans (probably Ernest Hogan), but the racially charged attitudes that followed the American Civil War, allowed white composers to appropriate it and make it their own. One of them was Ben Harney, who was often called the originator or father of ragtime (mostly by himself and later, by Time magazine after his death). Another was Mark Bernard, who was Harney’s rival, and the twice crowned “Ragtime King of the World.” Elizabeth Hutchison Bernard decided to pay tribute to her ancestor Mark, and the people who made this musical genre the phenomena it was, in this biographical, historical fiction novel.

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Women's Wartime Communications

Book Review of "Girls on the Line" a novel by Aimie K. Runyan


The women of the US Army’s Signal Corps were known as the “Hello Girls,” and their deployment to France at the end of 1917 was considered both controversial and expedient. When Ruby Wager’s brother is one of the first casualties of the war, she decides she must answer the call to help with the war effort. Ruby’s mother thinks she should stay at home, knit scarves and socks, and wait for the return of her fiancĂ©, so that she can marry him and take her rightful place in Philadelphia’s genteel society. But that’s not enough for Ruby, who sees joining the Signal Corps as the most effective way to show her patriotism, while putting to use her natural and hard-earned talents. In this gripping historical fiction novel, Aimie Runyan brings to life the efforts and sacrifices these women made to help bring the “Great War” to a conclusion.

Friday, November 23, 2018

Join the New Release Challenge for 2019








2019 New Release Challenge Sign-up


2019 New Release Challenge logo - (un)Conventional Bookworms

About the 2019 New Release Challenge

The 2019 New Release Challenge is a year-long challenge in which the hosts aim to read books released in 2019.  Lexxie (un)Conventional Bookworms and Brandee are the sole hosts of the challenge, and they are happy to have as many people to sign up and participate! There is one post on the top of their homepage for all review links for the year, where the link will be open for books you read and review each quarter. (They also wanted to say a big thank you to Michelle @ Limabean Designs for creating their beautiful logo!!)

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Book Review and Giveaway Blog Tour: "A Light of her Own" by Carrie Callaghan

The Dutch Treat

Book Review: 

A Light of Her Own by Carrie Callaghan


Judith Leyster lived in Holland in the 17th century, during a time when such things as painting, needlework and music, were acceptable as feminine pastimes. For example, artist Frans De Grebber taught all his children to paint, including his daughter Maria, and he even took on Judith as an apprentice. Despite this, the domain for women was still mostly in the home, and not as professionals of any kind. This didn’t stop Judith and her unique talent from gaining entry into the Haarlem Guild of St. Luke, as one of their first female members. In this historical fiction novel, Callaghan paints a portrait of Judith with her colorful words.

Friday, November 2, 2018

Available NOW Book 3 of Jacey Bedford's Rowankind for pre-order!


I recently got the following email from my friend, author Jacey Bedford, which I had to share with my readers:

Book Three of Jacey Bedford's Rowankind Trilogy Will be Here Soon!


Penguin Random House just sent me a very nice email to ask me if I wanted to pre-order my own book! Though ROWANKIND isn't out until 4th December officially, it seems to say that (if you're in USA or Canada) you can pre-order the ebook for delivery on 27th November.

Pre-ordering helps the author like this: When you pre-order a book, it tells bookstores people want this book, which makes them typically stock more copies of the book, which of course means more people see it and buy it.

So, of course I'd be very grateful if you're thinking of buying Rowankind, that you pre-order, either ebook (USA and Canada only) or paperback version.

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Home Again, Kathleen




The Kennedy Debutante by Kerri Maher


This biographical, historical fiction novel, by debut author Kerri Maher, focuses on the life of Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, later known as Kathleen Cavendish, the Marchioness of Hartington. Before she became a Marchioness, Kick was the fourth child and second daughter, of Joseph and Rose Kennedy, who were also the parents to President John F. Kennedy, and his brother Robert F. Kennedy. While these two Kennedys later were in the spotlight across the world for their political activities (and subsequent assassinations), much less about Kick is remembered today. In this book, Maher works to correct this oversight, and remind us of what this woman could have been, had her life not been cut so short. 
(Thanks for the free book, @PRHGlobal / @prhinternational)

Saturday, October 6, 2018

The Gilding of a Lady

A Well-Behaved Woman by Therese Anne Fowler 


The wealth of the Vanderbilt family was astounding both in their day and by today’s standards, even if one never takes inflation into account. Back in the late 1800s, that should have meant something. However, all it meant was that they had mounds of money, because their family hadn’t lived in America enough generations for them to be accepted into New York’s high society. Alva Smith, on the other hand, had the appropriate lineage and standing, but her family’s fortune was ravaged by the Civil War and were on the brink of starvation. Although the subtitle of this book is “A Novel of the Vanderbilts” Fowler’s latest novel is really more Alva’s story than that of a whole family. 

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Educating Harry

Man and Boy by Tony Parsons 


The blurb for this book on Goodreads says, “Harry Silver had it all: a beautiful wife, a wonderful son, a great job in the media. But in one night he throws it all away. Then Harry must start to learn what life and love are really all about.” So generally, I hate it when I read that a character “had it all” because we all know from this that something is going to go terribly wrong, and the book is going to be all about their struggle to recover from some tragedy that’s not really their fault. However, in this instance, we immediately see that he’s to blame for his own predicament, so I figured this one might be a little different. More importantly, I was looking for something that wouldn’t be as heavy as some of the other books I’d recently finished reading, and the blurbs on the cover did talk about this one being funny. That’s the main reason I decided to read this book. The question is, was it a good choice or not? 

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Ghostly Blues

The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton 


According to Goodreads, this book is “a story of murder, mystery, and thievery; of art, love and loss. And flowing through its pages like a river, is the voice of a woman who stands outside time, whose name has been forgotten by history, but who has watched it all unfold…” of course, the woman is refers to is the titular Clockmaker’s Daughter. However, her voice is hardly the only one we hear in this book, and the many other voices spread across time, beginning in the mid-1800s through the 21st century. 

This is actually the first Morton I’ve read, even though I know we have one or two of her novels on our shelves; I’ve simply never gotten around to reading any of them. This is obviously a hole in my literary education, because what I found here was quite unexpected on several levels.