Saturday, December 26, 2015

A Recipe for Secrets

The Restaurant Critic's Wife by Elizabeth LaBan


It wasn't as if Lila didn't know what she was getting into when she married Sam, but she didn't know what Sam was going to get into when he got his dream job of restaurant critic for a major Philadelphia newspaper. With her toddler daughter and another baby on the way, Lila knows that moving to a new city isn't going to be easy. However, Sam is making it even harder for her, because he's suspicious of everyone, including the neighbors. That's because if a restaurant critic doesn't have his anonymity, he can't write an objective review, since the chef and staff will never treat him like just another customer. To top it all off, not only is Lila lonely because she can't make friends, she's also aching to go back to work. Unfortunately, going back to her high-profile position as a crisis manager for the Addison Hotel chain can only put Sam's attempts at obscurity in even more danger.

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Teaser Tuesday - December 22, 2015



Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of A Daily Rhythm. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:


  • Grab your current read (or the next book on your reading list)
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My Teaser:
 "Waiting for a table at Igloo can be like running the Iditarod sled race— it’s a test of endurance, and it might even involve sledding, not to mention encounters with bear noses and free-range venison. But once you settle beneath the fur in your igloo and start in on some good old Inuit bison-marrow dumplings, you’ll realize it was worth the wait to find the Eskimo’s house. —Sam Soto" 
--  The Restaurant Critic's Wife by Elizabeth LaBan.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Depths in simplicity

My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout


If there is one quote from this novel that both sums it up, and yet is also the exact opposite of what this story tries to do, it is this: "we never know, and never would know, what it would be like to understand another person fully. It seems a simple thought, but as I get older I see more and more that she had to tell us that." The "she" in this quote refers to Sarah Payne, an author that holds a writing workshop that Lucy attends. This is a very truthful and telling line, both for writers and readers alike. Yet, this is exactly what authors attempt to convey to their readers - a story where we can understand another person fully. That Elizabeth Strout (author of the Pulitzer Prize winning collection of short stories Olive Kittredge) is able to reveal the character of Lucy Barton to her readers so fully, is only part of her genius. The other part is that she does it with such economy of text (just over 200 pages), making this book virtually magical.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Feature & Follow Friday (December 18, 2015)



Feature & Follow is a blog hop hosted by Parajunkee and Alison Can Read. The purpose is to meet new people and gain more followers in the book blogging community. 

Saturday, December 12, 2015

Confessions of a Frustrated Reader

Anachronisms & Inaccuracies


My friend, author Rabbi Ilene Schneider recently wrote a post on her blog called "Blueberries in Hammonton in 1920? - Doubtful," which discusses researching something that seemed to her to be an historical inaccuracy from the TV show "Boardwalk Empire." Such anachronisms can ruin watching movies, TV shows and of course, reading novels. I'm sure that like you, I've come up against these kinds of problems of inaccuracies with many novels; most of which have to do with areas I know quite a bit about. Of course, even when that is the case, before I say anything about these problems, I'll start researching the items to make sure my initial impression is correct. Two of my most prominent examples are as follows:

Saturday, December 5, 2015

How do you eRead?

Seeing as I'm in between reviews, I thought I'd discuss something a little different. No, not chocolate (although I certainly could), but rather what I've discovered about eReading, and how I read eBooks these days.

Anyone who read either of my early posts about print vs. eBooks will know that I'm still certain that dead tree books are still very much long for this world. Although those posts are both over two years old, I haven't changed my mind. I also don't intend to, because frankly, I doubt I'll ever tire of reading from the printed page.

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Teaser Tuesdays (December 1 2015)



Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of A Daily Rhythm. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:


  • Grab your current read (or the next book on your reading list)
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My Teasers:
 "Between Moose Jaw and Saskatoon, Harry had certainly seen stretches that seemed to bear out the jibe, but as he left the Battlefords behind and drove the laden cart along the almost deserted dirt road towards Cut Knife, he was pleased to see mature stands of trees and then even a hill or two. It wasn't exactly Derbyshire, he told himself, but neither was it Norfolk.
-- Page 199, chapter nineteen, A Place Called Winter by Patrick Gale.