Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Guest Author Post by Roz Morris: Out of sight, but not out of mind

As noted in my recent review of Roz Morris' travel diary book Not Quite Lost: Travels without a Sense of Direction, Roz's afterward for that darling travel diary truly fascinated and more importantly, intrigued me. So I requested she write a post for this blog based on some of the things she mentioned there. Without further ado, please enjoy this lovely piece about her real life travels, writing fiction and personal history.

Out of sight, but not out of mind

by Roz Morris


I have an averagely bad memory, and this has a nice advantage - I can reread books with only the slightest sense of déjà vu. It was certainly handy when I compiled my most recent book, a travel diary called Not Quite Lost: Travels Without A Sense of Direction. The book was distilled from 20 years of notes, and trawling through them made them new again.

Friday, September 22, 2017

Matching Wartime Messages

Last Christmas in Paris by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb


When the "war to end all wars" began in the summer of 1914, British soldiers were sure that they'd all be home for Christmas. Unfortunately, they didn't know that many of them wouldn't make it to see that Christmas, or the next or the next one after that. To get to the heart of this era, historical fiction writers Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb bring us this mostly epistolary work of the letters that Evelyn (aka Evie) Elliott writes and receives from those she loves, including ones she shares with her life-long friend, Thomas Harding.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Book Promotion & Excerpt: Sleep, Savannah, Sleep by Alistar Cross

BAM Literature is pleased to announce the release of:

SLEEP, SAVANNAH, SLEEP

by Alistair Cross 


RELEASE DATE SEPTEMBER 25, 2017



The Dead Don’t Always Rest in Peace

Jason Crandall, recently widowed, is left to raise his young daughter and rebellious teenage son on his own - and the old Victorian in Shadow Springs seems like the perfect place for them to start over. But the cracks in Jason’s new world begin to show when he meets Savannah Sturgess, a beautiful socialite who has half the men in town dancing on tangled strings.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

The Guestbook Spy

Not Quite Lost: Travels without a Sense of Direction by Roz Morris


It isn't often that I read non-fiction, but when I do, I often find travel books to be the most pleasurable way to remain within the realm of reality. However, sometimes these can be filled with long, drawn-out descriptions of pre-planned, extended jaunts, which can become tedious, no matter how well written they might be.
Despite this, for some reason, vicariously visiting places I've never been, or will probably never get to makes me happy, and not the least bit filled with regret. That's why when I received an offer to read this collection of random travel diary entries, I practically jumped at the opportunity. In this little collection, Morris takes us to various unknown spots, mostly within Britain. While this might sound mundane, I can assure you that it is anything but that.

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Hallelujah for Vinyl


The Music Shop by Rachel Joyce


Rachel Joyce's newest novel begins with this simple line, "There once was a music shop." No, this isn't a fairy tale; instead, what follows is a complex journey of two people on the backdrop of a soundtrack that’s equally as eclectic as they are. It’s the 1980s and Frank believes that music can heal people, and he has a knack of begin able to find just the right piece for whatever that person needs. However, Frank also believes in vinyl and refuses to sell anything but them in his shop, despite the music industry's growing adoration of CDs. However, with his accident-prone helper Kit, and a slew of oddball neighbors with them on Unity Street, it looks like this fading neighborhood is the next up for developers and their dreams of gentrification. Into all this walks Ilse, who immediately faints and thereby changes Frank's life as well as that of everyone else.

Sunday, September 3, 2017

A Founding Mother's Story

I, Eliza Hamilton by Susan Holloway Scott



In order to avoid stating the obvious, I see no reason to start this review with a story synopsis. This is because I believe that even those with only a cursory knowledge of American history will have heard the name Alexander Hamilton, and immediately recognize that name as one of the country's "Founding Fathers." In fact, with the popularity of the musical "Hamilton," I'd be willing to bet that more people have heard that name than ever before. On the other hand, even people with good knowledge of late-18th and early-19th century American history may not know much about Elizabeth (aka Eliza) Hamilton, the wife of Alexander. With this novel, Scott decided to fill that gaping hole in our American historical education, and did so through this amazing woman's own eyes.